• Users Online: 4599
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
CASE REPORT
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 44-47

An unusual guest in an unusual location of the brain of a rural tribal man


1 Department of Microbiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
2 Department of Neurosurgery, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
3 Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
4 Department of Pathology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
5 Department of Medical Parasitology, Post Graduate Institute for Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Kavita Raja
Department of Microbiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (SCTIMST), Thiruvananthapuram - 695 011, Kerala
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jacm.jacm_9_22

Rights and Permissions

We report a rare occurrence of central nervous system hydatid disease involving the occipital lobe caused by Echinococcus multilocularis in an immunocompetent rural tribal man. A 40-year-old man presented with gradual onset of headache for 6-month duration with associated seizures and giddiness. Neurological examination revealed cerebellar signs with visual field defect. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilobulated cystic lesion with membranous septations and peri-lesional oedema involving the left occipital lobe. Wet mount examination of the aspirated cystic fluid showed multiple daughter cysts and hooklets with histopathological examination showing features suggestive of hydatid disease. The identification of the causative organism was confirmed as E. multilocularis by conventional polymerase chain reaction. The patient's condition improved during the post-operative period and was discharged 2 days later, on oral albendazole for 3 months. At 2 years follow-up, the patient neurological symptoms have recovered with minimal visual field defect.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed178    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded4    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal